Climate Fiction in the news

Recommended books:

STILLICIDE By Cynan Jones (New York Times) – “In “Stillicide,” the through-line is an iceberg headed for London. The novel opens many years after Britain has entered an extended drought, and enough time has passed for one phase of responses to yield to the next. After becoming a target for terrorists, a pipeline to the city has been replaced by a train that carries millions of gallons of water from a distant reservoir, equipped with automatic guns to mow down any moving object near the tracks.”

THE NEW WILDERNESS By Diane Cook (The Guardian) – “Above all, she seems to ask: how will we regard one another once the climate crisis finally becomes the uncontested crucible of our time?”

A CHILDREN’S BIBLE By Lydia Millet (Grist) – “There was just this sort of righteous rage about climate and extinction and other matters of monolithic stature that I hadn’t really observed in my own generation at their age, or even now. People of my general age bracket, we just had this kind of complacency to us. For as long as I can remember, we’ve been willfully turning away from anything that seems overly dramatic, overly earnest, overly serious. I wanted to write about the way that might play out in this particular scenario, where I populate a summer house with this group of families.”

EJECTED By Dawn Pape (Female First) – “Non-fiction books detailing the horrors of climate change abound. But the solutions in these books are often brief, superficial, and too often presented in a textbook-like, unengaging manner. My goal was to create a story with relatable characters who naturally weave complex social and political aspects of climate change together.”

News:

Climate Fiction Festival (Literaturhaus Berlin) – 4th – 6th Dec 2020, online – see their “Why cli fi?” article

Climate fiction shifts readers’ beliefs

Climate fiction competition results

Everything Change Climate Fiction Contest announces winners, forthcoming anthology

With the world on fire, climate fiction no longer looks like fantasy

Ten Eco-Fiction Novels Worth Discussing – “Eco-fiction is a cross-genre phenomenon, and we are all awakening—novelists and readers of novels—to our changing environment. We are finally ready to see and portray environment as an interesting character with agency.”

8 best climate emergency books to help you better understand the crisis

Published by Lauren James

Lauren James is the twice Carnegie-nominated British author of many Young Adult novels, including The Reckless Afterlife of Harriet Stoker, The Loneliest Girl in the Universe and The Quiet at the End of the World. She is also a Creative Writing lecturer, freelance editor, screenwriter, and the founder of the Climate Fiction Writers League. Her upcoming release is Green Rising, a climate change thriller. Her books have sold over a hundred thousand copies worldwide, been translated into five languages and shortlisted for the YA Book Prize and STEAM Children’s Book Award. Her other novels include The Next Together series, the dyslexia-friendly novella series The Watchmaker and the Duke and serialised online novel An Unauthorised Fan Treatise. She was born in 1992, and has a Masters degree from the University of Nottingham, UK, where she studied Chemistry and Physics. Lauren is a passionate advocate of STEM further education, and many of her books feature female scientists in prominent roles. She sold the rights to her first novel when she was 21, whilst she was still at university. Her writing has been described as ‘gripping romantic sci-fi’ by the Wall Street Journal and ‘a strange, witty, compulsively unpredictable read which blows most of its new YA-suspense brethren out of the water’ by Entertainment Weekly. The Last Beginning was named one of the best LGBT-inclusive works for young adults by the Independent. Lauren lives in the West Midlands and is an Arts Council grant recipient. She has written articles for numerous publications, including the Guardian, Buzzfeed, Den of Geek, The Toast, and the Children’s Writers and Artist’s Yearbook 2021. She teaches creative writing for Coventry University, WriteMentor, and Writing West Midlands, providing creative writing courses to children through the Spark Young Writers programme.

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