Good guys and bad guys: a writer’s perspective by Chris Beckett

The original prototype for my novel America City was a short story I wrote in 2012 about an American politician called Stephen Slaymaker.  I wanted to write about global warming, and the context of the story was an America in about a hundred years’ time, that was already almost completely closed off to climate refugeesContinue reading “Good guys and bad guys: a writer’s perspective by Chris Beckett”

John Lacey talks about Hope Jones

Give me Hope, Jones. Bijal Vachharajani talks to Josh Lacey about his Hope Jones Middle Grade series. When I was studying climate change in Costa Rica, one of the things that stuck with me amidst all the doom and gloom we knew to expect, was that hope is what keeps the world spinning. Because withoutContinue reading “John Lacey talks about Hope Jones”

The Arctic on Fire: A Nordic Perspective on Climate Fiction by Emmi Itäranta

As I am writing this in the early days of July 2021, Kevo weather station at the northernmost tip of Finland has just registered the second-hottest ever temperature measured in Finnish Lapland since records began, and the hottest in over a century. Sweden and Norway have (once again) seen some record-brushing temperatures for June; newsContinue reading “The Arctic on Fire: A Nordic Perspective on Climate Fiction by Emmi Itäranta”

Jamie Mollart discusses Kings of a Dead World

League members Kate Kelly and Jamie Mollart discuss his new book, Kings of a Dead World, out now with Sandstone Books. The Earth’s resources are dwindling. The solution is The Sleep: periods of hibernation imposed on those who remain with only a Janitor to watch over the sleepers. In the sleeping city, elderly Ben strugglesContinue reading “Jamie Mollart discusses Kings of a Dead World”

Using bat illustrations to write about big issues for young children by Emma Reynolds

Picture books are powerful – they are often human’s first experiences of stories, and as such they have the power to literally shape who we are, and we carry these stories and messages into adulthood. They are also a chance for bonding between a child and their adult, often read at bedtime snuggled up togetherContinue reading “Using bat illustrations to write about big issues for young children by Emma Reynolds”

Marissa Slaven and Michael Muntisov discuss their new thrillers

Two of our members, Marissa Slaven and Michael Muntisov, have both written about a near-future world suffering the effects of climate change. Even though Marissa lives in Canada and Mike in Australia, they were able to catch up over Zoom to talk about their books. Here’s an extract from their conversation. MARISSA: You know, asContinue reading “Marissa Slaven and Michael Muntisov discuss their new thrillers”

Young activists – to be encouraged! by Anthea Simmons

I am really proud to have written a book about young activists. The young are all too often dismissed as naïve and ill-informed, when they are often quite the reverse. Clear-sighted and unburdened by the baggage of political bias or tribalism or the potential drag of adult experience, they see the world with an energyContinue reading “Young activists – to be encouraged! by Anthea Simmons”

Rachel Griffin talks about YA The Nature of Witches

Rachel Griffin talks about her debut novel, out now with Sourcefire Books. Tell us about your new book. The Nature of Witches is a young adult contemporary fantasy set in a world where witches have long maintained the climate but are starting to lose control. It follows Clara Densmore, an Everwitch whose rare magic isContinue reading “Rachel Griffin talks about YA The Nature of Witches”

Weather as Antagonist in Climate Fiction by Sim Kern

It’s been raining all week here in Houston, which is to say, I haven’t been sleeping. For most of my life, I loved the sound of a thunderstorm lulling me to sleep. But after surviving more floods, tropical storms, and hurricanes than I can count on both hands, the sound of thunder now triggers anxiety.Continue reading “Weather as Antagonist in Climate Fiction by Sim Kern”

Fiona Barker talks about her new picture book

Mary Woodbury interviews Fiona Barker about her new picture book Setsuko and the Song of the Sea, out now. I run Dragonfly.eco, an exploration of world eco-fiction, which includes a database of hundreds of novels about humanity’s impact on our natural world, including the omnipresent climate disruption. Being a mother and aunt, I have oftenContinue reading “Fiona Barker talks about her new picture book”